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Coronavirus vaccine for dogs

Coronavirus vaccine for dogs


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Coronavirus vaccine for dogs, cats and horse: a quick guide

The first coronavirus vaccine for dogs, cats and horses, is now available in Europe, but there are concerns the product may not be as effective as the human vaccine.

The veterinary vaccine is made by Vets At Hand, an Australian company. It is made by inactivated virus, which means that any harmful or potentially harmful infectious organisms have been destroyed. Inactivated vaccines do not contain live virus but rather “whole inactivated viruses,” the company says.

Vets At Hand says it has conducted extensive research into the development of the vaccine. Its first test on dogs and cats was on a variety of breeds, aged one to 10 years and the vaccine was found to be highly effective in all of them.

There is no research available on the vaccine’s effect in horses, but one horse vaccine manufacturer says its own research is similar to the vaccine available for cats and dogs.

Here’s what you need to know about the veterinary vaccine.

What is a coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a family of viruses that are typically associated with colds and flu.

The virus that has been identified as the cause of Covid-19 (or Covid-19) is in the coronavirus family. It is a novel virus, meaning it is a new kind of coronavirus, not one previously seen.

In recent years, many new coronaviruses have emerged, including the common cold coronavirus (CoV 229E) and Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) coronavirus.

In late 2019, an outbreak of pneumonia occurred in Wuhan, Hubei province, China, that is believed to have been caused by a new coronavirus.

What is in the vaccine?

The veterinary coronavirus vaccine contains a whole inactivated virus. It is a killed virus, meaning that the virus has been altered and changed so that it is unable to grow and live. It contains no living virus but the inactivated form of the virus.

This is different to the coronavirus vaccine for people that contains a live vaccine, or a live virus, to produce an immune response in the person receiving the vaccine.

The veterinary coronavirus vaccine is made from the virus that is being tested, not an animal-based virus such as those associated with SARS or MERS. The company says this reduces the chance of a vaccine being developed that could be harmful.

Vets At Hand also says the vaccine is completely safe for use in dogs, cats and horses.

A veterinary coronavirus vaccine for dogs, cats and horses contains a whole inactivated virus. Vets At Hand

How long does the vaccine last?

The vaccine is not designed to be used for a number of years and it is not expected to become a long-term product. It will not be a one-off vaccine but is intended as an annual vaccine.

Vets At Hand says it has conducted extensive research into the development of the vaccine. Its first test on dogs and cats was on a variety of breeds, aged one to 10 years and the vaccine was found to be highly effective in all of them.

There is no research available on the vaccine’s effect in horses, but one horse vaccine manufacturer says its own research is similar to the vaccine available for cats and dogs.

What conditions is the vaccine designed for?

The vaccine is designed to protect dogs, cats and horses against canine coronavirus (CCoV), feline coronavirus (FCoV) and equine coronavirus (ECoV). It is not intended for other animal species such as dogs and cats, including those with specific diseases like canine distemper, canine parvovirus and feline parvovirus, or dogs infected with parasites or other bacteria.

It is not licensed for use in other species, but some people are using the vaccine on other species including small and large dogs, horses, cattle, ferrets and rabbits.

Is it available in the UK?

The vaccine is being released in Europe. It is not currently available in the UK.

Will my vet recommend it?

It is unlikely that your vet would recommend the veterinary coronavirus vaccine. It is designed for veterinary use and, as the vaccine is not licensed for use in the UK, it would only be available with veterinary advice.

The veterinary coronavirus vaccine is being launched in Europe, but the UK is yet to receive it. Getty

What is the recommended dosage?

The vaccine is recommended to be given annually to dogs, cats and horses, with the vaccination course completed between 12 and 16 months of age.

There are two doses of the vaccine recommended, one at 12 months of age and one between 15 to 18 months of age. A booster dose is recommended when the first vaccine is administered.

There is no maximum dose recommended, but Vets At Hand says that as this is a vaccine designed for a variety of breeds, it is unlikely that more than one dose would be required.

Can I administer the vaccine to my dog myself?

If you are going to administer the vaccine yourself, it is recommended to consult your vet first.

What can I use instead?

The vaccine is being launched in Europe and may not be available in the UK. As a result, it is unlikely that your vet will recommend it. The vaccine is designed for use in dogs, cats and horses and so is not suitable for other animal species.

Vets At Hand says you can use other vaccines to help protect your pet against CCoV, FCoV and ECoV, including the vaccines that are being recommended by the World Small Animal Veterinary Association. These include a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine, a killed virus (KV) vaccine and a modified killed virus (MkV) vaccine.

As a reminder, the company says that dogs and cats that are vaccinated against these other viruses will still need to be vaccinated against coron